Icinga 2 v2.7.1 bugfix release

We’ve come around several issues with Icinga 2 v2.7.0 and fixed them with this new v2.7.1 release. It also contains other bug fixes requested by Icinga partners and their customer support (Livestatus, DB IDO downtimehistory).
There also was an issue with large configuration files being synced in distributed environments. Aside from the bugfix the configuration sync logs now tell you how many bytes will be synced for better debugging low bandwidth issues. Cluster setups could also run into the problem that the “Downtime End” event was not correctly updated in the IDO database history tables. (more…)

Monthly Snap August – v2.5, InfluxDB, Contributions

IMG_0330We keep working together as an open source community. We’re here to listen what you say – keep it polite and encourage/motivate us to solve your problem with you as best as we can. Lean back and think how others would react if you click “send”, frustrated with an issue tab opened in your browser. Sometimes it doesn’t hurt to just close the tab or rephrase. The person on the other end (dev and/or user) will appreciate it. In the end we all are human beings with emotions, language & culture differences and offline needs (friends, family, hobbies, etc.). What we have in common – we all want to build a great Icinga monitoring product together 🙂
Bernd did a great ignite on that topic with “Working in and with Open Source Communities” at DevOpsDays Amsterdam (video starts at 17:35).
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Icinga 2 v2.5 released

We’ve come a long way with our new release Icinga 2 v2.5. After the 2.4 release in November we’ve focussed on fixing many of the remaining bugs. 2.5 isn’t just a feature release – it includes all the bugfixes from the past months. (more…)

Buch! Buch! I wer' narrisch!*

It’s done. There is a book about Icinga 2 available as hardcopy (right now) and e-book (coming soon). icinga2_coverThere is only one minor drawback: It’s entirely in German. Since Lennart and me are German native-speakers, we decided it would be best to write the book in German, too. (In fact I’m Austrian, but Austrian is so similar to German that linguists still argue if it’s the same language or not)
But don’t you despair, if you can’t read German and don’t have the time to learn how to. We are still negotiating whether there will be an English version of the book or not. We will keep you updated.
If you are able to read German, here’s what is in the book:

  • Installation of Icinga 2 including the ClassicUI and Icinga Web 2
  • Thorough introduction to the Icinga 2 configuration language
  • Monitoring with the Icinga 2 agent, NRPE and SSH
  • Notifications
  • Distributed monitoring with satellites
  • Best Practices about how to plan and implement a monitoring setup
  • 100 pages about monitoring plugins
  • Graphing with Graphite and PNP
  • Logmanagement with Logstash
  • Business Processes
  • Reporting
  • Appendices with lots of extra code examples

The whole book uses a fictional company for examples which are backed with actual code. The examples were not only tested in a test environment but some are taken out of actual setups from customers (We are  Icinga consultants for a living)
So, if you want to order one (or more) book you can do so via Amazon, directly from the publisher or many other sources. E-books are still in the pipeline but will be available via most stores, too. If you’re not sure if you want to buy one, the publisher has some samples on the website.
* The headline means “Book! Book! I’m going crazy!” in Austrian. It’s a reference to a commentary to the soccer game Germany-vs-Austria Córdoba 1978 (just replace Book with Tor, which means Goal) which is even famous outside of the soccer fanbase. In fact I don’t like soccer at all but I thought it would be a nice headline.
For your reference: